LW.12628 / LW.12629
Professor Jason Schultz
Professor Anne Hassett
Open to 3L and 2L students
Maximum of 12 students
Spring semester
4 credits*
Prerequisites: See below.

Course Description

This course will explore the practice of law interfacing with intellectual property (IP), information privacy, technology, and/or innovation in various professional settings. These settings include serving as a lawyer in a non-profit organization, such as a university technology transfer office and/or entrepreneurship center, non-governmental intellectual property policy organization, judicial internship, and government agency that is responsible for advising on, implementing, and administering policies and procedures relating to IP, information privacy, technology, and/or innovation issues. The course consists of a fieldwork placement (10 hours per week) in an appropriate professional setting and a seminar (two hours per week).

The learning goals of this course are (1) to develop an understanding of the types of IP, information privacy, technology, and/or innovation issues that arise in these different professional settings and how they are addressed, (2) to develop an appreciation for how perspectives on the importance of or need for IP, information privacy, technology, and/or innovation protection may vary depending on the lawyer’s professional setting, (3) to assess the range of practice skills that may be most effective in the delivery of IP, information privacy, technology, and/or innovation legal counseling services in each of these different professional settings, and (4) to consider ethical issues that may arise in these different settings.

For each of the professional settings in which students are doing fieldwork, we will discuss the business model and goals of their fieldwork setting, who are their clients for IP, information privacy, technology, and/or innovation legal counseling services, the range of IP, information privacy, technology, and/or innovation legal services that arise, how the entity’s IP, information privacy, technology, and/or innovation legal counseling needs are identified, how the IP, information privacy, technology, and/or innovation legal counseling services are delivered, and the roles and dynamics of the various people involved in meeting that entity’s IP, information privacy, technology, and/or innovation legal counseling needs. We will assess similarities and differences among these settings and draw lessons on the practice skills that help a lawyer in that type of setting deliver her highest value as an IP, information privacy, technology, and/or innovation legal counselor.

Classes will provide opportunities for students to examine the practice of IP, information privacy, technology, and/or innovation legal counseling in diverse settings; gain familiarity with various legal and policy issues relating to IP, information privacy, technology, and/or innovation protection across various industries and business models; develop skills in legal research and writing, factual investigation, administrative procedures, litigation, licensing, deal assessment, and policy assessment; and reflect on their fieldwork. The seminar will include presentations by a number of practitioners, experts, and government policymakers in the relevant fields of IP, information privacy, technology, and/or innovation law and practice.

Course Prerequisites

Students taking this course should be concurrently registered or have previously passed a course in intellectual property or information law, or be able to demonstrate such expertise based on prior work experience.

Application Procedure

Students interested in applying for the clinic should submit the standard application, resume, and transcript online through CAMS. To arrange an interview, please use the CAMS system as well. If you have questions regarding the application procedure, please contact Susan Hodges.


* 4 credits include 2 clinical credits and 2 academic seminar credits.